The Stars in Our Pockets: Getting Lost and Sometimes Found in the Digital Age

The Stars in Our Pockets: Getting Lost and Sometimes Found in the Digital Age Book Summary

What shapes our sense of place, our sense of time, and our memory? How is technology changing the way we make sense of the world and of ourselves?

The human brain's ability to adapt has been an evolutionary advantage for the last 40,000 years, but now, for the first time in human history, we're effectively living in two environments at once--the natural and the digital--and many of the traits that help us online don't help us offline, and vice versa. Drawing on his experience of acclimating to a life of solitude in the woods and then to digital life upon his return to the city, Howard Axelrod explores the human brain's impressive but indiscriminate ability to adapt to its surroundings. The Stars in Our Pockets is a portrait of, as well as a meditation on, what Axelrod comes to think of as "inner climate change." Just as we're losing diversity of plant and animal species due to the environmental crisis, so too are we losing the diversity and range of our minds due to changes in our cognitive environment.

As we navigate the rapid shifts between the physical and digital realms, what traits are we trading without being aware of it? The Stars in Our Pockets is a personal and profound reminder of the world around us and the worlds within us--and how, as alienated as we may sometimes feel, they were made for each other.

Title:The Stars in Our Pockets: Getting Lost and Sometimes Found in the Digital Age



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    The Stars in Our Pockets: Getting Lost and Sometimes Found in the Digital Age Reviews

  • Kathleen

    My review for the Chicago Tribune: https://www.chicagotribune.com/entert...Often, after I finish reading a book that I admire, Ill snap a photograph of the cover and tweet a recommendation, tagging th...

  • Jenn

    I won a copy of this book.Put down your phone and see how long you can go without checking it. Seriously, face down on the table. Within reach, but not touching it. Are you comfortable enough in your ...

  • Luke Goldstein

    Looking back over the past generation you could easily be tempted to describe its entirety in a single word: progress. Time progressed, technology progressed, and society progressed right alongside, b...

  • Sasha

    Its either to Howard Axelrods credit or to my blame (or both) that I was able to read so far into The Stars in Our Pockets before registering how purely technophobic the book is. Its tone is much more...

  • Sarah

    What I want us to protect isnt just the distinctive range of consciousness within each of us but also the ability to share that distinctiveness with each other. Thats the only way Ive found to feel le...

  • Kevin Revolinski

    Favorite thought-provoking/philosophical read of 2020, so far. I am having a love-hate relationship with the hyper-connected phone/internet/social media world, and this explores many of the concerns q...

  • Tayyaba (Tubz)

    Just incredible. I was blown away by this book seriously. There were so many times where I had to put it down and say "omfg that's so effing true." This book starts off with Darwin's natural selection...

  • Annarella

    This book is full of food for thought. I'm still grokking it so I have some issues to in words my thoughts.I can only say something like Please-read-it.Strongly recommended.Many thanks to the publishe...

  • Sally Ray

    Literary nonfiction reads as an essay. Axel rods treatise on how digital things like cellphones change our brains is not a reflection of research or scientific investigation. However, it is very reada...

  • Camille Pum

    I won this book in the giveaway! My thoughts lost some coherency as Howard Axelrod took me through different thought processes, exposing me to new ideas at the same time. Inspiring. Is sure to leave y...