Physical Intelligence: How the Brain Guides the Body Through the Physical World

Physical Intelligence: How the Brain Guides the Body Through the Physical World Book Summary

Elegantly written and deeply grounded in personal experience--reminiscent of works by Oliver Sacks--this book gives us a clear, illuminating examination of action intelligence, the fundamental relationship between the physical world and the mind.

Using behavioral neurology and cognitive neuroscience as a lens, Scott Grafton accounts for the workings and the design of the action-oriented brain, bringing to light the action intelligence inherent in all of us and which is always busy solving problems of physicality: Ever wonder why you don't walk into walls or off cliffs? How do you decide if you can drive through a snowstorm? How high are you willing to climb up a ladder to change a lightbulb? Grafton draws from the insights and discoveries of engineers who have learned to emulate the sophisticated solutions that Mother Nature created for managing incredibly complex behavior, and demonstrates the relevance of action intelligence with examples that each of us might face, whether it be in the mundane (walking down the street), in the exceptional (winning a foot race), in the extreme (walking to the South Pole), or in the impaired (walking with a limp).

Title:Physical Intelligence: How the Brain Guides the Body Through the Physical World



Enjoy the book review !

    Physical Intelligence: How the Brain Guides the Body Through the Physical World Reviews

  • Armen Shirvanian

    I had once read "Social Intelligence" "Emotional Intelligence", and "Ecological Intelligence" by Daniel Goleman, and "Physical Intelligence" continues the set in the domain of body/mind connection and...

  • Khadija

    This was a good book for those interested in why and how we move the way we do, but who don't also want to read a textbook to find out. The author describes some studies that have brought us to our cu...

  • Michaela

    Very interesting how our bodies move based on our brain's functions and how it can be tricked. Also weird asides as to how belly-dancers' abdominal muscles are salamander-derivative and how frightenin...

  • Adnan Khaleel

    Its a decent book on the subject matter, but I really wish the author spent more time writing about physical intelligence, rather than just talk about it in an analagous sense with his hiking trip as ...

  • William

    This was a special book. The author made, as I expected, many allusions to the findings that the body operates in a way that allows us to navigate through the environment without waiting to consult ou...