John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court

John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court Review

The life of John Marshall, Founding Father and America's premier Chief Justice

In 1801, a genial and brilliant Revolutionary War veteran and politician became the fourth Chief Justice of the United States. He would hold the post for 34 years (still a record), expounding the Constitution he loved. Before he joined the Court, it was the weakling of the federal government, lacking in dignity and clout. After he died, it could never be ignored again. Through three decades of dramatic cases involving businessmen, scoundrels, Native Americans, and slaves, Marshall defended the federal government against unruly states, established the Supreme Court's right to rebuke Congress or the president, and unleashed the power of American commerce. For better and for worse, he made the Supreme Court a pillar of American life.

In John Marshall, award-winning biographer Richard Brookhiser vividly chronicles America's greatest judge and the world he made.

Title:John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court

    Some Testimonial About This Book:

  • George P.

    The life of John Marshall (1755–1835) spans the first and formative decades of the United States. Born in colonial Virginia, Marshall fought for American independence under George Washington, whom h...

  • Jon

    A very enjoyable, well-written, biography with touches of humanity to it. This is my third biography I've read on John Marshall (2nd this year), and first book I've read written by Richard Brookhiser....

  • Nate

    A biography of the most important Supreme Court Justice in US history is not something you except to fly through. Nevertheless, once Marshall got onto the Supreme Court, I moved through the book very ...

  • Bookreporter.com Biography & Memoir

    Earlier this year, I read an engrossing biography of the Wright Brothers by the estimable David McCullough --- engrossing, that is, until about three-quarters through the book, when the Wrights are ch...